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NORTHWEST LOGGING HISTORY
George W. English - at LAKE CAVANAUGH
The images below, with the words copied from the Skagit River Journal  describes what information is possible.
      By the late 1920's, the market was hungry and English was
running out of trees in the foothills,
so he moved the operation further into the hills.
The new Camp 7 was three miles east of Finn Settlement. A train
track was extended from Bryant.

      The company logged that area for six years and English also purchased Camp 8, or Finn Settlement,


In 1924 the railroad toward Lake Mac Murray from Camp 2 was extended many miles the new
Camps 9 and 10 at the
west and east ends of
Lake Cavanaugh, respectively.

Click the Lake MacMurray button.
It can be noted that the
current Hwy. 9 was built
on some of this track bed.

Camp 10 played out sooner, in 1929, and Camp 9 continued until 1937. The skidders,
(See photo below),
for these camps were switched from wooden sleds to steel cars so that they could be moved more easily.


      In 1925 English formed Camp 11 as the base for logging on Frailey and Stimson mountains, west of Bryant, and it continued until 1935, according to Bill Mason.


Saw cutting just some info / in the old days the fallers used gas with paraffin melted in it to use on the saw to keep pitch build up from happening also made it slide easier / note paraffin melts when placed in the gas
SLIP
TONGUE
SKIDDER
WOODEN  SKIDDER
Section Map: